JuST (Juvenile Sex Trafficking) Conference – Session Descriptions

STHBANNER


Our staff and presenters would like to thank all of our attendees for joining us at this year’s Sharing the Hope event. It was an outstanding success. We are sorry to have missed those who were unable to come and hope to see you next year. Please note that we are unable to issue refunds for any individual who did not submit the request 24 hours in advance of the JuST Conference. Thank you for your understanding.

Pre-conference – November 7

12:00-1:00pm    Press Conference

1:00-5:00pm      National Colloquium*

5:00-8:00pm      Meet and greet at Hamilton hotel’s “14K Bar”
                                      Earlybird check-in for JuST Conference 

*National Colloquium agenda to be posted separately

The following conference sessions will be offered November 8-9, 2013.
Some sessions are available to everyone, while some are law enforcement only.

JuST Conference—November 8

Day 1

7:30-8:30am    Check-in

8:30-9:15am     General Session: Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking

9:30-10:30am   Session 1  (choose one of the following)

Leveraging Lessons Learned – Addressing the Gaps in Victim-centered Care
An open panel session that will discuss the findings and next steps from the National Colloquium on Shelter and Services for Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking Victims as well as recommendations from its recently released report representing perspectives from over 100 experts. Hear from survivors and direct services providers as they discuss firsthand experience with emerging trends and barri­ers encountered in the effort to secure restorative shelter and services for juvenile sex trafficking victims. (Double session, lasting until lunch) (Facilitated by Eliza Reock, Shared Hope International)

American Pimps: Recruitment and Control
Attendees will understand the traditional and trending methods used by traffickers for recruitment and grooming of victims, as well as how they maintain control through coercion and violence. The instructor will review the terminology and culture associated with pimping, break down stereotypes and share from her personal experience as a survivor. (Shamere McKenzie, Shared Hope International)

Where Human Trafficking Profits: The Hostile Work Environment of Adult Entertainment Establishments
Individuals employed in the U.S. are protected under federal law through Title VII from a hostile work environment created by sexual harassment. However, victims of human trafficking who are exploited throughout adult clubs end up slipping through the cracks due to the inherent hostile environment and the employers’ passive allowance, or active facilitation, of trafficking. This presentation will expose the reality of the night club environment, as well as the symbiotic and profitable relationships between club employers and traffickers at the expense of the victim’s safety, health, and economic viability. (Emily Tocci, Student/Survivor advocate)

Investigating and Prosecuting a Human Trafficking Case: A Collaborative Approach
Members of the D.C. Human Trafficking Task Force will present a case study involving juvenile trafficking victims.  From the initial response through a thorough investigation and ultimately to a disposition of the case, prosecutors, law enforcement and NGOs worked closely together to prosecute the trafficker and serve the victims.  The case is a model of a collaborative approach. (Ari Redbord, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Department of Justice; Detective Steve Schwalm, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department, Special Agent Alicia McShane, FBI)

Assembling the Sex Trafficking Investigator’s Toolbox:  Complex Case Development, Digital Profiling and Victim Partnership
During this session, law enforcement personnel will be exposed to overall case development strategies.  These strategies will span the full duration of case management from referral and identification to prosecution.  Of particular interest will be examples of data management and analysis to expose critical evidence, digital profiling of suspects and victims, as well as strategies for engaging the victim’s expertise, and the related benefits.  Sample cases will be presented step-by- step to illustrate the importance of a comprehensive case management strategy. (Sergeant Grant Snyder, Minneapolis Police Department)(Law Enforcement only)

10:45-12:00pm   Session 2 (choose one of the following)

Leveraging Lessons Learned – Addressing the Gaps in Victim-centered Care (continued)
An open panel session that will discuss the findings and next steps from the National Colloquium on Shelter and Services for Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking Victims as well as recommendations from its recently released report representing perspectives from over 100 experts. Hear from survivors and direct services providers as they discuss firsthand experience with emerging trends and barri­ers encountered in the effort to secure restorative shelter and services for juvenile sex trafficking victims. (Double session, lasting until lunch) (Facilitated by Eliza Reock, Shared Hope International)

Through the Healthcare Provider’s Eyes
This session focuses on best practices for the recognition, intervention, and referral of commercial sex trafficking survivors in the health care setting.  Signs and symptoms exhibited by survivors will be discussed along with medical management, provider and survivor safety, documentation, and referral options.  Target audience:  physicians, nurse practitioners, EMTs, paramedics, case managers, physician assistants and others who may encounter survivors in the health care setting. (Cathy Miller, RN, PhDc)

Cook County Sheriff’s Office Human Trafficking Response Team and Juvenile Justice System
Wards of the state who are also victims of human trafficking constitute a unique population of clients with very specific and specialized treatment needs. While anyone can become a victim of sex trafficking, research with adolescent victims has demonstrated a common set of risk factors that increase their vulnerability— the very same factors present in profiles of youth involved in state care. This presentation will focus on how the Cook County Sheriff’s Office responded to this growing victimization by establishing the Child Protection Response Unit, identifying and redirecting juvenile victims to the appropriate treatment modalities. (Marian Hatcher, Cook County Sheriff’s Office)

The Role of Gangs in Trafficking
Local and international investigations have revealed that gangs are targeting young females for prostitution enterprises. This presentation will enlighten attendees on the threats of gang-controlled prostitution in their communities, help identify potential victims of gang trafficking, and emphasize the necessity of a collaborative and comprehensive solution to the issue. (Detective Bill Woolf, Fairfax County Police Department)

Assembling the Sex Trafficking Investigator’s Toolbox:  Complex Case Development, Digital Profiling and Victim Partnership (continued from Session 1)
During this session, law enforcement personnel will be exposed to overall case development strategies.  These strategies will span the full duration of case management from referral and identification to prosecution.  Of particular interest will be examples of data management and analysis to expose critical evidence, digital profiling of suspects and victims, as well as strategies for engaging the victim’s expertise, and the related benefits.  Sample cases will be used in a step-by-step practicum to illustrate the importance of a comprehensive case management strategy. (Sergeant Grant Snyder, Minneapolis Police Department)(Law Enforcement only)

12:00-1:00pm     Lunch

1:00-1:30pm    Special guest speaker

1:45-3:15pm     Session 3 (choose one of the following)

American Pimps: Recruitment and Control (repeat)
Attendees will understand the traditional and trending methods used by traffickers for recruitment and grooming of victims, as well as how they maintain control through coercion and violence. The instructor will review the terminology and culture associated with pimping, break down stereotypes and share from her personal experience as a survivor. (Shamere McKenzie, Shared Hope International)

Shadow Children: Addressing Child Sexual Abuse and Commercial Sexual Exploitation within the Family
The workshop will discuss the crossover between child sexual abuse victims and commercial sexual exploitation within the family.  The discussion will focus on the extent of exploitation within families and how it affects children, including in depth discussion and case examples. (Rita Farrell, National Child Protection Training Center)

In Plain Sight: Using a Screening Tool for Identifying Trafficked Youth
The development and implementation of a well-structured screening tool can help identify trafficking victims and prevent them from further falling through the cracks. This presentation will use a multidisciplinary team to address the foundations of an effective screening tool, thoughts for adapting to specific settings and system structures, and challenges to implementation and referrals.  Drawing on a recent case study for specific examples, participants will hear how a community-based provider, Maryland’s Department of Juvenile Services, and law enforcement have come together to actively screen for and respond to trafficking victims in the juvenile justice system. (Amelia Rubenstein, TurnAround; Corporal Chris Heid, Maryland State Police Department; Trina Lyles, Maryland Department of Juvenile Services)

It’s All in the Brain: the Neuroscience of Trauma
This session covers the latest neuroscience involving the brain and the fear response and includes how parts of the brain, brain development, memory, learning and the autonomic nervous system of the body are impacted by trauma. (Bonnie Martin, LPC)

Juvenile Prostitution Investigations: From the Mouths of Offenders and Victims
This presentation will address behavioral issues present in juvenile sex trafficking investigations, including unique victim and offender dynamics. Interviews with incarcerated offenders and victims will be incorporated into the presentation. Results of ongoing research at the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit will also be presented. (Supervisory Special Agent Terri Patterson, FBI)(Law enforcement only)

3:30-5:00pm     Session 4  (choose one of the following)

The SERVE model: Brain-based Therapy and Evidence-based Treatment.
This session covers a brain approach to reduce adverse effects of trauma through Symptom normalization, Education of the brain’s stress response, Regulation of autonomic nervous system and thought processes, Validation of anger and grief, and Empowerment of fully integrated self. An overview of evidenced-based treatment models will be provided. (Bonnie Martin, LPC)

Don’t Quote Me on That!
The relationship between survivors and the media has often been a tense one. This session will bridge the gap between both groups, providing a more clear understanding of goals, priorities, and how to better respect each other’s role in the fight against trafficking. Only survivors and media representatives invited. (Facilitated by Shamere McKenzie, Taryn Offenbacher, Shared Hope International; Stacy Lewis, Playwright/Survivor advocate; Holly Smith, Author/Survivor advocate; Heather Sells, Reporter, Christian Broadcasting Network

Inside the Mind of a Victim
This presentation takes attendees through every facet of walking in a victim’s shoes. Starting from the grooming process moving through trafficking and into restoration; Inside the Mind of a Victim helps providers understand the psyche behind each step a survivor takes, even into recovery and restoration. This workshop will help attendees understand what a victim is thinking and feeling through his/her process. This interactive workshop will also allow attendees to process and respond to sample situations they could face in the workplace today. (Rebecca Bender, Author/Survivor advocate)

Predators and the Internet: Protecting Kids from the Monster Behind the Screen
This presentation will address the use of the internet in crimes against children and provide attendees with resources available that address online safety for teens.  Additionally, individuals will leave the training with a better understanding of signs of grooming and online recruitment as well as methods for safe intervention and reporting to law enforcement. (Melissa Snow, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children; Laurie Nathan, NetSmartz; Special Agent James Hardie, FBI)

Approaching the Demand Side of Human Trafficking
This workshop will address how to set up successful John stings, how to properly use the information garnered from these stings, and explore new tactics to address demand. (Detective Leland Wiley, Montgomery County Police Department)(Law enforcement only)

5:00-6:00pm      Networking reception (Refreshments provided)

 

JuST Conference—November 9

Day 2

8:30-9:30am     General Session: Addressing Demand

9:45-11:00am      Session 5  (choose one of the following)

State Action. National Change.  (Policy and Advocacy Workshop)
This session will introduce the Protected Innocence Challenge Framework, which outlines the laws needed to protect children from sex trafficking and bring justice to those exploited. It will review trends and developments in state laws responding to the crime of domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST). Legislative advocates from Maryland and Oregon will present the challenges and strategies to getting crucial bills passed in the 2013 sessions. Participants will also be introduced to the Demanding Justice Project and the preliminary results of Shared Hope’s newest research on the enforcement of anti-demand laws. (Samantha Vardaman, Esq., Christine Raino, Esq., Shared Hope International; Joel Shapiro, Esq.)

Engage, Support, Integrate, Succeed:  Wrap-Around Services for Minor Victims of Trafficking
Wrap-around has been defined as an intensive, holistic method of engaging with individuals with complex needs (most typically children, youth, and their families) so they can live in their homes and communities and achieve their hopes and dreams. Traditional wrap-around services have involved children and their families, engaging them as partners in identifying services which ensure positive outcomes.  Unfortunately, for many minor victims of sex trafficking, family engagement is not always feasible.  Even then, working with victims, their families and/or care givers is an essential process for ensuring positive outcomes.  This session will discuss developing an initial plan of
care, using high quality planning processes that reflect the wrap-around principles and answer questions related to the value of wrap-around systems of care, staff roles, training, resources and more. (Courtney Gaskins, PhD, Youth for Tomorrow; Stephanie Vu, Student/Survivor advocate)

The Real World: Teen Edition
Social and cultural influences are affecting the behavior of teens and increasing their potential to become pimps, buyers or victims of trafficking. Develop a plan for prevention by knowing your obstacles and the resources at your disposal. Learn how to implement culturally relevant techniques to reach this generation’s youth and be equipped to give teens a fresh approach to viewing the culture around them. (Liz Alston, Shared Hope International)

Therapeutic Foster Care and Building Community: A Model of Care for Sexually Exploited Youth
This workshop will address the invaluable role of therapeutic foster care in meeting the needs of safe shelter for trafficking victims. Presenters will share how to implement trauma-informed and strength-based approaches to care, how to support foster and biological parents and how to create a community-based advocacy center that effectively supports everyone within the youth’s restoration plan. (Stephanie Holt, Mission21; George Hendrickson, Kindred Family Services)

Operation Guardian Angel
This presentation will address how to develop an undercover sting operation for federal prosecution targeting the “johns” of minor sex trafficking. Instructor will review United States v Bagley, et al – a case study of a trafficker and customers’ sadistic sexual torture and sale of a young domestic trafficking victim. (Cynthia Cordes, Assistant U.S. Attorney, Western District of Missouri)(Law enforcement only)

11:15-12:30pm      Session 6  (choose one of the following)

Breaking Down the Barriers: A Collaborative Effort to Prosecuting Offenders and Treating Victims of Sexual Exploitation
In the war against Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking, the only solution is a comprehensive solution.  Law enforcement, service providers and the community must come together to collectively intervene and prevent this terrible crime.  This presentation will serve to explore the pros and cons to multi-disciplinary collaboration.  Participants will further discuss what a collaborative model could look like within their respective jurisdictions, as well as how it can function while respecting existing policies. (Detective Bill Woolf, Fairfax County Police Department; Deepa Patel, LCSW, Multicultural Clinical Center)(Service providers and Law enforcement only)

10 Myths of Safe House Operations
In this workshop we will debunk 10 common myths of starting and operating a safe house for minor victims of sex trafficking. We will provide insight into day-to-day shelter operations and practical advice to those that desire to open or work in a domestic safe home. This workshop is applicable to both faith-based and non-faith based audiences. (Emily Fitchpatrick, On Eagles Wings, Hope House)

Interviewing Adolescents

Participants will understand the unique challenges facing forensic interviewers and investigators when working with adolescent victims of child maltreatment.  The training will provide videos of forensic interviews along with interviewing techniques for adolescents. Attendees will explore tentative disclosures and implications of development on interviews and cases. (Rita Farrell, National Child Protection Training Center)

Do Not Pass Go: How to Go to Jail and Make a Difference.
Hope is a powerful tool. Learn how a group of volunteers initiated and maintained a program to engage and incentivize at-risk youth in juvenile detention. Discover practical ways to respond to the issue of trafficking through prevention, identification and intervention with potential victims at one of their most vulnerable points. Attendees will be provided successful team-building and mentoring techniques as well as best-practice steps to follow up and follow through. (Kishore Carey, Hopewell Youth Ministry/Paladins Trust)

It Happens to Boys, Too
Girls are not the only victims of sex trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation, it happens to boys too. This presentation will educate the participants on domestic minor sex trafficking (DMST) and commercial sexual exploitation (CSE) of boys. Participants will become familiar with the common vulnerabilities and risk factors associated with male DMST and CSE, and review the primary methods by which boys are trafficked. Participants will leave empowered to apply knowledge of male DMST/CSE into their daily work practice. (Anna Smith, Restore One)

Identifying Child Sex Trafficking Victims in Missing Child Cases
This presentation will provide an overview of the relationship between missing children and child sex trafficking in the United States. Attendees will become familiar with the analytical resources provided to law enforcement investigating these types of cases by the Child Sex Trafficking team at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. Analysts process 900+ online advertisements a month featuring possible child sex trafficking victims and work to connect them to missing child cases. In addition, analysts provide technical assistance reports to law enforcement in their efforts to build cases and successfully prosecute those individuals involved in trafficking children. (Meghan Perkins, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children)(Law Enforcement only)

12:30-1:30pm      Lunch

1:30-2:00pm        Special guest speaker

2:15-3:30pm      Session 7  (choose one of the following)

Chosen for Activism: Busting Myths About How YOU Can Take Action
Want to make a difference but feel overwhelmed? This workshop will showcase Shared Hope’s latest prevention resource, Chosen, to demonstrate how anyone can use it effectively within their school system or local community to raise awareness. Staff will walk through a typical awareness presentation, offering attendees tips and techniques to be an effective speaker as well as practical ideas for talking to school administrators, school resource officers, youth, and community leaders about the issue of sex trafficking. (Liz Alston, Shared Hope International)

Countering the Culture of Demand
Learn about the root causes of demand for sex trafficking in America from a historical, scientific, and cultural perspective. Learn about the link between pornography and prostitution — and how ending demand ultimately comes down to one thing: men. (Nick Lembo, Shared Hope International)

Gang Trafficking: A Treatment Perspective
Often seen as offenders, female victims of gang trafficking receive little sympathy and few services. Their loyalty to the gang, as well as their exposure to violence, psychological control and substance abuse creates barriers for intervention that most clinicians find hard to penetrate. This presentation will provide the most effective treatment approaches for victims of sexual exploitation within gang dynamics. (Deepa Patel, LCSW, Multicultural Clinical Center)

Playing Nice in the Sandbox:  Developing Effective Multi-Disciplinary Teams (MDT)
This workshop summarizes the history of development of multi-disciplinary teams in the United States and then, armed with that history, discusses the ten greatest challenges facing MDTs today. It will offer any individual working with a team, task force or coalition concrete suggestions for meeting these challenges. (Rita Farrell, National Child Protection Training Center)

Following the Electronic Trail
Investigations have revealed the unsettling targeting of juveniles being recruited into commercial sex enterprises through the internet. As the traffickers exploit technology to recruit, manage and further their criminal activities, law enforcement and its partners are working to use that same technology to take these criminals off the street. This presentation will seek to enlighten the audience on the means and manners that criminals are using to enhance their operations. It will also focus on investigative methods used in the identification of victims, steps to dismantle these predatory sex traffickers and the necessity of a collaborative and comprehensive solution to the issue.
(Detective Bill Woolf, Fairfax County Police Department)(Law enforcement only)

3:30 pm       Conference concludes

This is the final and complete list of workshops and presentations available at the 2013 JuST Conference.

Many of these sessions will be held concurrently over two days.

Check back for the final program and speaker bios.


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